Broadcasters and Citizens in Europe

Trends in Media Accountability and Viewer Participation

Edited by Paolo Baldi and Uwe Hasebrink

Edited by Paolo Baldi and Uwe Hasebrink

Distributed for Intellect Ltd

128 pages | 6-3/4 x 9
Cloth $50.00 ISBN: 9781841501604 Published April 2007

European media is experiencing a paradoxical form of growth: as media outlets surge and new technologies develop, major broadcasting companies are consolidating like never before. In Broadcasters and Citizens in Europe, an esteemed group of contributors look at what this paradox might mean for the European community. Are broadcasting audiences better informed than they were twenty years ago? And how has the advent of the European Union changed media practices? This essential volume explores a new media world in the context of a continent in flux.

 

“The book is a good source of information about institutional arrangements developed in European countries in the field of audio-visual policy. It gives an interesting and well-written account of how particular European countries and the European Union try to deal with different problems deriving from the ethical dilemma inscribed in the construction of media systems.”—Magdalena Rek, Journal of Contemporary European Studies
 
“Communication scholars will benefit from the focus on research from across Europe along with the theoretical implications. For media policy-makers and members of civic organisations, the taxonomy of instruments will provide an overview for possible policy development. Finally, the clarity with which this book is written will help college students understand the field of media and social responsibility.”— Jarim Kim, Media International Australia
 
 
Magdalena Rek | Journal of Contemporary European Studies

“The book is a good source of information about institutional arrangements developed in European countries in the field of audio-visual policy. It gives an interesting and well-written account of how particular European countries and the European Union try to deal with different problems deriving from the ethical dilemma inscribed in the construction of media systems.”

Jarim Kim | Media International Australia

“Communication scholars will benefit from the focus on research from across Europe along with the theoretical implications. For media policy-makers and members of civic organisations, the taxonomy of instruments will provide an overview for possible policy development. Finally, the clarity with which this book is written will help college students understand the field of media and social responsibility.”

Contents
Introduction: overview of a European study
Paolo Baldi and Uwe Hasebrink 
 
Media accountability in Europe: a fragmented picture
Paolo Baldi

1. Media accountability is entering into the political agenda
2. Europe: a highly fragmented picture
2.1. Most-advanced countries
2.2. Less-advanced countries
2.3. The “under construction” countries
3. Concluding remarks 
 
UK broadcasting policy: the “long wave” shift in conceptions of
accountability
Richard Collins and Zoe Sujon

Introduction
1. Accountability: exit, voice and loyalty
2. Accountability: proposals for change at the BBC
3. UK broadcasting policy: the “long wave” shift in the dominant framework
4. Conceptions of the citizen and the consumer in broadcasting policy
4.1. Citizens’ “legitimate expectations”
4.2. Social capital and new thoughts on citizenship
4.3. Potter, consumer theory and evaluation of the accountability of UK broadcasters
5. The 2003 Communication Act: a new consumer and citizen consciousness 46
6.Conclusion
 
The protection of viewer rights in Europe
Bernd Holznagel and Christiane Jungfleisch

Introduction
1. Basic general principles
1.1. Media law
1.2. Media authorities
2. Main instruments and obligations
2.1. Legal instruments for the viewers
2.2. Legal obligations for the broadcasters
3. Three types of countries
3.1. Homogeneous countries
3.2. Inhomogeneous countries
3.3. Countries in progress
4. Conclusion 
 
Media users’ participation in Europe from a civil society perspective
Uwe Hasebrink, Anja Herzog & Christiane Eilders

Introduction
1. Viewers – not just consumers
2. Viewers – civil society actors?
3. Options provided for viewer participation in Europe
3.1. Representation in controlling bodies
3.2. Communication platforms
3.3. Complaints procedures
3.4. Audience research
4. Viewer associations
4.1. Main objectives
4.2. Types of activities
5. Conclusions
5.1. Viewer participation across Europe
5.2. Viewer participation as civil society activity
5.3. Viewer participation on the European level 
 
Viewers’ rights in the European Union: policies and instruments
Paolo Celot and Fausto Gualtieri

Introduction
1. Access to the institutions: instruments and procedures
1.1. European Parliament, Committee on Petitions
1.2. European Commission: complaints concerning failure to comply with community law
1.3. Actions brought to the Court of Justice of the European Communities (ECJ)
1.4. The European Ombudsman
1.5. European Court of Human Rights
1.6. Internal Market law problem-solving network (Solvit)
1.7. The European Consumer Centres and request for intervention to the European Extra-Judicial Network (EEJ-Net) 
 
2. General principles on consumer protection
2.1. European Union
2.2. Council of Europe
3. Relevant EU policies and advisory bodies
3.1. EU Consumer Affairs policy
3.2. Audio-visual policy
4. Conclusions 
 
 
Abbreviations and Acronyms 
 
References 
 
About the authors
For more information, or to order this book, please visit http://www.press.uchicago.edu
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