Cloth $40.00 ISBN: 9780226661278 Will Publish January 2020
E-book $40.00 Available for pre-order. ISBN: 9780226661308 Will Publish January 2020

Conventional Realism and Political Inquiry

Channeling Wittgenstein

John G. Gunnell

Conventional Realism and Political Inquiry

John G. Gunnell

208 pages | 6 x 9 | © 2019
Cloth $40.00 ISBN: 9780226661278 Will Publish January 2020
E-book $40.00 ISBN: 9780226661308 Will Publish January 2020
When social scientists and social theorists turn to the work of philosophers for intellectual and practical authority, they typically assume that truth, reality, and meaning are to be found outside rather than within our conventional discursive practices.

John G. Gunnell argues for conventional realism as a theory of social phenomena and an approach to the study of politics. Drawing on Wittgenstein’s critique of “mentalism” and traditional realism, Gunnell argues that everything we designate as “real” is rendered conventionally, which entails a rejection of the widely accepted distinction between what is natural and what is conventional. The terms “reality” and “world” have no meaning outside the contexts of specific claims and assumptions about what exists and how it behaves. And rather than a mysterious source and repository of prelinguistic meaning, the “mind” is simply our linguistic capacities. Taking readers through contemporary forms of mentalism and realism in both philosophy and American political science and theory, Gunnell also analyzes the philosophical challenges to these positions mounted by Wittgenstein and those who can be construed as his successors.
 
Contents

Introduction

1              Representational Philosophy and Conventional Realism
2              Mentalism and the Problem of Concepts
3              The Realistic Imagination in Political Inquiry: The Case of International Relations
4              The Challenge to Representational Philosophy: Wittgenstein, Ryle, and Austin
5              Contemporary Anti-representationalism: Sellars, Davidson, Putnam, McDowell, and Dennett
6              Presentation and Representation in Social Inquiry
7              Conventional Realism
8              The Quest for the Real and the Fear of Relativism
Conclusion

Acknowledgments
References
Index

For more information, or to order this book, please visit https://www.press.uchicago.edu
Google preview here

Chicago Manual of Style

Keep Informed

JOURNALs