Paper $42.95 ISBN: 9781856498142 Published April 2001 For sale in North and South America only
Cloth $99.95 ISBN: 9781856498135 Published April 2001 For sale in North and South America only

100 Ways of Seeing an Unequal World

Bob Sutcliffe

100 Ways of Seeing an Unequal World

Bob Sutcliffe

Distributed for Zed Books

304 pages | 5.4375 x 8.5 | © 2001
Paper $42.95 ISBN: 9781856498142 Published April 2001 For sale in North and South America only
Cloth $99.95 ISBN: 9781856498135 Published April 2001 For sale in North and South America only
This highly original visual book is designed as a teaching aid -- for students in conventional courses as well as readers wanting to tease out for themselves an understanding of the contemporary world in which we live. Tested prior to publication in a number of teaching settings, the author builds on the fact that there is now a large body of statistical information about today's highly unequal world. Presenting it in visual form can greatly stimulate discussion and understanding. Each topic has a two-page spread -- innovative diagrams and charts on one side; a short text prompting further thinking and discovery on the other.

Ideal as a supplementary teaching tool in Current Affairs, Development Studies and International Relations classes as well as in less formal training and education settings.

Topics include:
* Human Inequality -- between classes, men and women, ethnic groups.
* Inequalities between North and South -- output, jobs, hours worked.
* Income distribution -- North and South; urban and rural; within countries and between them.
* Demographic differences -- men and women; North and South.
* Agriculture, food and diet.
* Unequal integration into the world economy -- production, trade, raw material prices, the profits of multinational corporations, debt, aid.
* The Environment - the economy's uneven ecological footprint.
* Refugees and Migration.
* Armed Forces and Violence.
* The Changing History of Inequality.
Contents
Introduction: our unequal world
 
The data, the graphs and the text
 
Glossary of frequently used technical terms
 
Acknowledgements
 
I Production, work and income
 
1. Fundamental inequalities between North and South
2. Contrasting structures of production and labour
3. Different production structures
4. Changes in the labour force, 1960-1998
5. Activities of the world’s workers: field, factory and office
6. Differing hours of labour, I
7. Differing hours of labour, II
8. Two ways of comparing incomes
9. What work will buy, 1998
 
II The inequality of income
 
10. Contrasting degrees of income inequality
11. What the richest 10 percent get
12. Who is hyper-rich?
13. What the poorest 10 percent get
14. Who is poor?
15. Two examples of growing inequality
16. The growth of inequality in the USA, 1960-1997
17. World distribution I: the unequal city
18. Details of the city
19. World distribution II: unequal terrain
20. Unequal rewards for work
21. Income and human development compared
 
III Inequalities of births, lives, health and deaths
 
22. The world division of the population
23. Differences in the expectancy of life
24. Demographic transitions, 1967-1993
25. Contrasting structures of population
26. The minority of the population
27. Differences in the proportion of men and women
28. Female compared with male life expectancy
29. Men and women: the effects of age, time and development
30. Men and women: the effects of geography and migration
31. Different rates of dying
32. Dying: the effects of class, sex, age and race
33. The sex ratio in China and South Asia
34. Excess female mortality and some causes
35. What people die of
36. The extent of inoculation
37. Child mortality
38. The epidemiological transition
39. Different levels of disability
40. The changing nature of death
41. Inequalities in health spending
42. The size of families and households
 
IV Land, agriculture, food and hunger
 
43. Dividing the earth
44. The distribution of the land
45. Different patterns of agriculture
46. Crop yields and the green revolution
47. Unequal access to food: calorie supply
48. The extent of undernourishment
49. Twenty-five years of success and failure in food production
50. Food crises in Africa
51. The contrast of two diets
52. Differences among the rich
53. Differences among the poor
54. Quantity and variety: the diets of the UK and Bangladesh
55. Animal and vegetable proteins
56. Staple foods
 
V Four sources of inequality
 
57. Four sources of wage inequality: the case of Brazil
            Sex
58. Sexual bias in access to education, 1997
59. The sexual bias of work and pay, 1995
60. Women and economic activity, 1997
61. Women’s and men’s share of earnings, 1993
            Urban bias
62. Urban bias in basic services
63. Levels of urbanization, 1998
            Regional differences
64. Regional differences in Brazil and Mexico
65. Regional differences in India and China
66. Regional differences in Nigeria and South Africa
67. Regional differences in the USA and the EU
            Race
68. Ethnic biases in the USA
69. The world as a macrocosm of apartheid
 
VI  The international economy
 
            International trade
70. Who exports what? The structure of world trade
71. Who exports where? The direction of world trade
72. The growing industrialization of trade
73. The North as a market for the South
74. The manufactured exports of the South
75. Winners and losers in trade, I
76. Winners and losers in trade, II
77. The problem of the terms of trade, 1960-1999
            Foreign investment
78. The growing importance of international investment
79. Where the foreign investment in the South goes
80. The relative importance of foreign capital
            International institutions
81. Multinational corporations of the North and the South, 1999
82. Who runs the IMF and the World Bank?
83. Who does the IMF run?
            The external debt
84. The total size of the foreign debt
85. The present burden of the debt
86. Some causes and effects of the debt crisis
87. Positive and negative transfers: South to North aid
88. Different kinds of debt, 1999
89. Who are the creditors?
            Development aid
90. Much money, little aid
91. The decline of aid, 1983-1998
92. Aid as a share of national income
93. North to South aid in total
94. North to South aid per head
 
VII The environment
 
95. How long will non-renewable resources last?
96. Energy use and pollution levels
97. Contrast in transportation
98. Tropical forests
99. A measure of sustainable human development
 
VIII Refugees and migration
100. The origin and destination of refugees, 1998
101. The main locations of forced migration, 1998
102. Who are the refugees?
103. Migration into Western Europe
104. Trans-Pacific migration
105. Migration in America
106. Immigrants to the USA
107. Migrants’ remittances: more important than aid
 
IX Repression and discrimination
 
108. The most militarized countries
109. The international arms trade, 1998
110. The death penalty in 2000
111. Differences in the rate of imprisonment
112. Prison in the USA, 1998
113. Lesbian and gay rights, 2000
 
X Inequality and History
 
114. The evolution of relative incomes, 1820-1997
115. The long-term polarization of world income, 1820-1997
116. Changes in inequality, 1950-1995
117. Contrasting movements in the hours of work, 1870-1992
118. The growth of literacy, 1850-1995
119. The expansion of schooling, 1820-1992
120. Rises and falls of life expectancy, 1820-1997
121. The combined evolution of income and human development, 1960-1997
122. The convergence of the Human Development Index over time, 1875-1995
123. Historical changes in the population of men and women, 1800-1995
 
Sources of the data
For more information, or to order this book, please visit http://www.press.uchicago.edu
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