The New Second Generation in Switzerland

Youth of Turkish and Former Yugoslav Descent in Zürich and Basel

Rosita Fibbi et al.

The New Second Generation in Switzerland

Rosita Fibbi et al.

Distributed for Amsterdam University Press

290 pages | 6 halftones | 6 x 9 | © 2015
Paper $49.95 ISBN: 9789089648433 Published October 2015 For sale only in the United States, its dependencies, the Philippines, and Canada
Using data from the Integration of the Second Generation in Europe survey, this timely study focuses on the Turkish and former Yugoslav second generation of immigrants in Switzerland. A common thread running through the various chapters is a comparison with previous research on Switzerland concerning the second generation of Italian and Spanish origin. The authors provide valuable insights into the current situation of the children of Turkish and Yugoslav immigrants while underlining the historical similarities and differences of their respective incorporation processes.
Contents
Preface

1 The new second generation in Switzerland
Youth of Turkish and former Yugoslav descent in Zurich and Basel
Rosita Fibbi, Ceren Topgül, Dušan Ugrina and Philippe Wanner
1.1 The old and the new second generation
1.2 Research on the second generation in Switzerland
1.2.1 The second generation from Italy and Spain
1.2.2 The new second generation from Turkey
1.2.3 The new second generation from Yugoslavia
1.3 The theoretical background
1.3.1 Second generation: Definition and historical processes
1.3.2 Structural integration
1.3.3 Deconstructing the national frame
1.4 The TIES study in Switzerland
1.4.1 Scope and structure of the book
 
2 Migration history and demographic characteristics of the two second-generation groups
2.1 Immigration in Switzerland: A general overview
2.1.1 Admission policies
2.1.2 Immigrant policies
2.1.3 Naturalisation policies
2.2 Immigration from Turkey and the successor states of Yugoslavia: A short historical appraisal
2.2.1 Immigration from Turkey
2.2.2 Immigration from Yugoslavia and its successor states
2.3 The agglomerations of Zurich and Basel
2.3.1 Demographic characteristics of the cities
2.3.2 The Turkish and SSYU populations in the agglomerations of Zurich and Basel
2.3.3 Structure of the labour market in the agglomerations of Zurich and Basel
2.3.4 Local integration policies in Zurich and Basel
2.4 Demographic characteristics of the second generation in the TIES sample
2.4.1 Age and sex structure of the sample
2.4.2 Civil status of respondents
2.5 Living arrangements
2.5.1 Living in the parental home
2.5.2 Leaving the parental home
2.6 The second generation and the institutional environment
2.6.1 Naturalisation behaviour
2.6.2 Turkish and SSYU communities in Basel and Zurich
2.7 Conclusions
 
3 Socio-demographic characteristics of the parents
3.1 Immigrant parents’ background
3.1.1 Regional background
3.1.2 Linguistic background
3.1.3 Family’s religious background
3.2 Educational background of the parents
3.2.1 Educational situation in Turkey and Yugoslavia in the seventies
3.2.2 The educational capital of parents
3.2.3 Parental local-language proficiency
3.3 Parental migration history and current work situation
3.3.1 Timing and reason for immigration
3.3.2 Naturalisation of Turkish and SSYU parents
3.3.3 Current status of parents’ labour force participation
3.4 Parental couples and household size
3.4.1 Couple composition and mixed marriages
3.4.2 Divorce rate and intact families
3.4.3 Household size
3.5 Conclusions
 
4 Education of the second generation
4.1 Main features of the Swiss educational systems
4.1.1 Pre-school and compulsory education
4.1.2 Post-compulsory secondary education
4.1.3 Tertiary education
4.1.4 Education systems in Zurich and Basel
4.1.5 Educational equity: An open question
4.2 Children of Turkish and SSYU descent in pre-school and primary education
4.2.1 Entry into the school system
4.2.2 Special classes in primary school
4.2.3 Concentration of immigrant origin children in primary school
4.3 Children of Turkish and SSYU descent in secondary education
4.3.1 Lower secondary schools
4.3.2 Post-compulsory education and training
4.3.3 Perception and experiences at school
4.4 Present educational situation
4.4.1 Currently in education
4.4.2 Training of respondents currently in education
4.4.3 Highest achieved level of respondents currently not in education
4.5 Factors influencing educational achievement
4.5.1 Family involvement in education
4.5.2 Intergenerational social mobility
4.5.3 Naturalisation: A positive selection?
4.6 Conclusions
 
5 Labour market position of the second generation
5.1 Labour market participation of foreigners and the second generation
5.1.1 Labour market position of foreigners
5.1.2 Labour force participation of the second generation
5.1.3 Factors afffecting labour force participation
5.2 Quality of labour market participation
5.2.1 Working conditions
5.2.2 Occupational level
5.2.3 Occupational prestige
5.2.4 Evaluation of career and living conditions
5.3 Barriers to efffective labour market integration
5.3.1 Access to first job
5.3.2 Access to the public sector
5.3.3 Mismatch between education level and job requirements
5.3.4 Perceived discrimination in the labour market
5.4 Conclusions
 
6 Identity
6.1 Multiple levels of identity
6.1.1 Present identifications of respondents
6.1.2 Naturalisation
6.1.3 Local attachments to city and neighbourhood
6.2 Language mastery and use
6.2.1 Mastery of local language
6.2.2 Mastery of parental language
6.2.3 Language use
6.3 Religion
6.3.1 Religious upbringing in the family
6.3.2 Retention of religious affiliation
6.3.3 Current religious affiliation and practice
6.3.4 Importance of religion in personal and public life
6.3.5 Feeling of belonging in Switzerland according to religious identification
6.3.6 Weak feeling of belonging to Switzerland
6.4 Conclusions
 
7 Social relations
7.1 Primary group relations
7.1.1 Family
7.1.2 Friendships and dating
7.2 Secondary group relations
7.2.1 Neighbourhood composition
7.2.2 School environment
7.2.3 Formal social networks
7.2.4 Civic participation via voting
7.3 Inter-ethnic relations
7.3.1 Hostility and discrimination
7.3.2 Attitudes towards multi-ethnic coexistence
7.4 Transnationalism
7.5 Conclusions
 
8 Union and family formation of the second generation
8.1 Union formation experience
8.1.1 Types of current relation
8.1.2 Age at f? irst marriage
8.1.3 Marriage market and family inf luence
8.2 Partner choice
8.2.1 Ethnic endogamy
8.2.2 Religious endogamy
8.2.3 Social and educational homogamy
8.3 Family life
8.3.1 Labour force arrangements in the couple
8.3.2 Parenthood
8.3.3 Gender roles
8.4 Conclusions
 
9 Assessing the social position of the new second generation
9.1.1 Socio-economic participation
9.1.2 Socio-cultural features
9.2 Second generation integration: Communities, contexts and outcomes
9.2.1 Ethnic settlements
9.2.2 Second-generation outcomes in Zurich and Basel
9.3 Old and new second generations in Switzerland: Structural integration and boundary making
9.3.1 Boundary definition
 
List of contributors
For more information, or to order this book, please visit http://www.press.uchicago.edu
Google preview here

Chicago Manual of Style

RSS Feed

RSS feed of the latest books from Amsterdam University Press. RSS Feed