Making a difference?

Exploring the impact of multi-agency working on disabled children with complex health care needs, their families and the professionals who support them

Ruth Townsley, David Abbott, and Debby Watson

Making a difference?

Ruth Townsley, David Abbott, and Debby Watson

Distributed for Policy Press at the University of Bristol

96 pages
Paper $28.95 ISBN: 9781861345738 Published February 2004 For sale in North and South America only
Many health, education and social service initiatives aim to implement better multi-agency working between agencies and professionals. But what difference does this sort of organisational change make to those families and children on the receiving end? Making a difference? explores the process and impact of multi-agency working on disabled children with complex health care needs and the families and professionals who support them. Examining in detail the work of six multi-agency services, the report describes the process of multi-agency working, key success factors, and outcomes for professionals, as well as the impact on families in terms of their daily life, well-being, and contact with services and professionals. A concluding chapter summarises key issues and makes recommendations for policy and practice.
Contents

Introduction

Introduction to the research: why ask about multi-agency working in services to disabled children with complex health care needs?

The six services: different types of multi-agency working

The impact of multi-agency working on professionals and agencies

Exploring the impact of multi-agency working on families' daily lives and well-being

Exploring the impact of multi-agency working on families' contact with services and professionals

How do disabled children and young people with complex health care needs experience multi-agency working?

Conclusions and recommendations

For more information, or to order this book, please visit http://www.press.uchicago.edu
Google preview here

Chicago Manual of Style |

RSS Feed

RSS feed of the latest books from Policy Press at the University of Bristol. RSS Feed