Laminar Technology and the Onset of the Upper Paleolithic in the Altai, Siberia

Nicolas Zwyns

Nicolas Zwyns

Distributed for Leiden University Press

414 pages | 238 halftones | 8 1/5 x 10 1/2
Paper $65.00 ISBN: 9789087281731 Published May 2014 For sale only in the United States, its dependencies, the Philippines, and Canada
The Siberian Altai region is home to a number of recently excavated Middle and Upper Paleolithic stratified sites. The data yielded from these sites provide key evidence illustrating changes in material culture corresponding to the transition from the Middle to the Upper Paleolithic. A detailed examination of the early development of Upper Paleolithic technical traditions in the Altai, this book presents a chrono-cultural model that combines archeological, environmental, genetic, and paleontological data and represents a major contribution to our understanding of the population growth during the Late Pleistocene in Asia. 
Contents
Foreword
 
1 Introduction
 
1.1 A brief history of Paleolithic archeology in the Altai
 
1.2 Geographical setting
 
1.3 Paleo-climate and environment
 
1.4 Human remains
 
1.5 The Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition in the Altai and the dispersal of MH in Asia
 
1.6 Summary
 
1.7 Transitional, Initial or Early Upper Paleolithic: why it matters
 
1.8 Formulating research questions
 
1.9 Proposing an alternative model
 
1.10 Structure of the study
 
2 Terminology and data recording
 
2.1 Taphonomic Approach
 
2.2 The sampling
 
2.3 Attribute analysis and reduction sequence
 
2.3.1 Attribute analysis
 
2.3.2 Reduction sequence
 
2.4 Artifacts general classification
 
2.5 Attribute analysis: blank attributes
               
2.6 Attribute analysis: core attributes
 
2.7 Reduction sequence
 
2.8 Reduction sequence reconstruction
 
2.9 Reduction sequence and technical tradition
 
3 The Kara-Bom Upper Paleolithic variant
 
3.1 Kara-Bom: Site Description and Technological Analysis
 
3.1.1 Geographical setting
 
3.1.2 Background
 
3.1.3 Stratigraphy
 
3.1.4 Chronology
 
3.1.5 Taphonomic approach
 
3.1.6 Sample composition
 
3.2 Laminar Technology: MPH1
 
3.2.1 Blank attributes
 
3.2.2 Cores: reduction patterns and size attributes
 
3.2.3 Reduction sequence reconstruction
 
3.3 Laminar Technology: OH6
 
3.3.1 Blank attributes
 
3.3.2 Cores: reduction patterns and size attributes
 
3.3.3 Reduction sequence reconstruction
 
3.4 Laminar Technology: OH5
 
3.4.1 Blank attributes
 
3.4.2 Cores: reduction patterns and size attributes
               
3.4.3 Reduction sequence reconstruction
 
3.5 Laminar Technology: OH4
 
3.5.1 Blank attributes
 
3.5.2 Cores: reduction patterns and size attributes
 
3.5.3 Core description
 
3.5.4 Reduction sequence reconstruction
 
3.6 Additional artifacts
 
3.6.1 Cores
 
3.7 Kara-Bom: MPH1, OH6, OH5 and OH4 sample comparisons
 
3.7.1 Blank attributes
 
3.7.2 Cores: reduction patterns and size attributes
 
3.7.3 Reduction sequence reconstruction: comparisons
 
3.7.4 Summary
 
3.8 Ust-Karakol 1 Site Description and Technological analysis of OH 5.4-5.5 assemblage (sector 1)
 
3.8.1 Geographical setting
 
3.8.2 Background
 
3.8.3 Stratigraphy
 
3.8.4 Chronology
 
3.8.5 Taphonomic approach
 
3.8.6 Sample composition
 
3.9 Laminar Technology: OH 5.4-5.5
 
3.9.1 Blank attributes
 
3.9.2 Cores: reduction patterns and size attributes
 
3.9.3 Reduction sequence reconstruction
 
4  The Ust-Karakol Upper Paleolithic variant
 
4.1 The Ust-Karakol and Anuy sites
 
4.1.1 UK1-1 OH 5.1-5.3
 
4.1.2 UK1-2
               
4.1.3 Anuy II
 
4.1.4 Anuy III
 
5 Comparing the research background and the new results
 
5.1 The Kara-Bom assemblages
 
5.1.1 Middle Paleolithic Horizon 1 (MPH1)
 
5.1.2 OH6 and OH5
 
5.1.3 OH4
 
5.2 Ust-Karakol 1 sector 1 (UK1-1)
 
5.2.1 OH 5.4-5.5
 
5.2.2 OH 5.1-5.3
 
5.3 Ust-Karakol 1 sector 2 (UK1-2)
 
5.4 Anuy II
 
5.5 Anuy III
               
5.6 Summary
 
6 Research question 1: technical traditions and laminar technology
 
6.1 The Initial Upper Paleolithic laminar technology
 
6.1.1 Large to medium blade reduction sequence
 
6.1.2 Small blade to bladelet technology
 
6.1.3 Relevant typological elements
 
6.2 Early Upper Paleolithic laminar technology
 
6.2.1 Blade technology
 
6.2.2 Bladelet and microblade production
 
6.2.3 Relevant typological elements
 
6.3 Two distinct Upper Paleolithic variants in the Altai
 
7 Research question 2: an alternative chrono-cultural model    
 
7.1 Testing the model: regional comparisons
 
7.1.1 Open-air sites
 
7.1.2 Cave sites
 
7.1.3 Summary
 
8 Research question 3: inter-regional comparisons        
 
8.1 Central Asia
 
8.1.1 Zeravshan basin
 
8.1.2 Afghanistan
 
8.1.3 Tajikistan
 
8.1.4 Tian-Shan
 
8.1.5 Kazakhstan
 
8.2 Siberia
 
8.2.1 Western Siberia
 
8.2.2 Central Siberia
 
8.2.3 Cis-Baikal
 
8.2.4 Trans-Baikal
 
8.3 Mongolia
 
8.3.1 Northern Mongolia
 
8.4 Southern Mongolia
 
8.5 Summary
 
9 Discussion, conclusion and perspectives
 
9.1 Discussion
 
9.1.1 IUP: defining the distinguishing features
 
9.1.2 IUP: the assignment
 
9.1.3 IUP: the origins
 
9.1.4 IUP: dispersal further east
 
9.1.5 IUP: the makers
 
9.1.6 IUP-EUP: the shift
 
9.1.7 EUP: laminar technology and retouched tools
 
9.1.8 EUP: the assignement
 
9.1.9 EUP: the origins
 
9.1.10 EUP: the dispersal
 
9.1.11 EUP: the makers
 
9.1.12 EUP: the end
 
9.2 Conclusions
 
9.3 Perspectives
 
References        
 
Table of Figures               
 
List of Tables     
 
Dutch Summary               
 
English Summary             
 
French Summary             
 
Acknowledgements      
 
Curriculum vitae
For more information, or to order this book, please visit http://www.press.uchicago.edu
Google preview here

Chicago Manual of Style |

RSS Feed

RSS feed of the latest books from Leiden University Press. RSS Feed