Paper $55.00 ISBN: 9789089643940 Published August 2012 For sale only in the United States, its dependencies, the Philippines, and Canada
E-book $55.00 ISBN: 9789048512980 Will Publish August 2012 For sale only in the United States, its dependencies, the Philippines, and Canada

iGovernment

Corien Prins, Dennis Broeders, Henk Griffioen, Anne-Greet Keizer, and Esther Keymolen

Corien Prins, Dennis Broeders, Henk Griffioen, Anne-Greet Keizer, and Esther Keymolen

Distributed for Amsterdam University Press

264 pages | 6 x 9 | © 2011
Paper $55.00 ISBN: 9789089643940 Published August 2012 For sale only in the United States, its dependencies, the Philippines, and Canada
E-book $55.00 ISBN: 9789048512980 Will Publish August 2012 For sale only in the United States, its dependencies, the Philippines, and Canada
The authors of this incisive study explore the problems of the ongoing digitization of government, such as the creeping loss of data quality, and how citizens and officials must respond to these complications in the coming years. The iGovernment is running full speed on information networks and digitization, but it is also seriously out of step with existing bureaucracies. iGovernment offers an accurate picture of how the digital technologies are shaping modern governments, and also a powerful corrective for the dissonance between technology and organizational management.
“This book will be a valuable resource for researchers and scholars seeking to understand the possibilities, dilemmas, and challenges of bringing the Internet and related technologies to center stage in government and public services”—Helen Margetts,University of Oxford

Contents
Preface
Summary

Part I: Introduction and Context
1. Digitizing the citizen and government
    1.1 The existential role of digitization
    1.2 iGovernment
    1.3 The iSociety
    1.4 Aim
    1.5 Methods and structure
2. Analytical framework: information, actors and principles
    2.1 Views on the relationship between technology and its users
    2.2 Technology and information
    2.3 Focus on the actors
    2.4 Three groups of principles: an analytical tool
    2.5 Weighing up the pros and cons
    2.6 In conclusion
Part II: Empirical Analysis
3. Managing eGovernment
    3.1 The enthusiasm and 'techno-trust' of politicians and policymakers
    3.2 Conclusion
4. From policy to reality
    4.1 Implementation without boundaries
    4.2 Local struggles
    4.3 Information-based policing
    4.4 Design and manifestation
    4.5 Conclusion
5. Exchange without borders
   
5.1 European information databases and information flows
    5.2 Conclusion
6. Market masters and mastering the market
    6.1 eGovernment as economic force
    6.2 The ICT market as an extension of public administration
    6.3 Responsibility for the ICT market
    6.4 Conclusion
7. Supervisors of eGovernment
    7.1 Existing supervisory bodies
    7.2 The multifaceted citizen
    7.3 Conclusion
Part III: Analysis and Recommendations
8. iGovernment
    8.1 eGovernment
    8.2 From eGovernment to iGovernment
    8.3 The paradox of iGovernment
    8.4 iGovernment without limits
    8.5 The implications of iGovernment without limits
    8.6 Self-aware iGovernment
9. Recommendations: working on iGovernment
    9.1 Weighing up the driving, underpinning and process-based principles
    9.2 Warning flags for iGovernment
    9.3 iGovernment institutions
    9.4 Implementing iGovernment

Afterword: iGovernment and iSociety
Abbreviations and acronyms
References
List of interviewees
For more information, or to order this book, please visit http://www.press.uchicago.edu
Google preview here

Chicago Manual of Style |

RSS Feed

RSS feed of the latest books from Amsterdam University Press. RSS Feed