Blinded by Science

The Social Implications of Epigenetics and Neuroscience

David Wastell and Susan White

Blinded by Science

David Wastell and Susan White

Distributed for Policy Press at the University of Bristol

256 pages | 6 1/4 x 9 1/4
Paper $45.95 ISBN: 9781447322344 Published June 2017 For sale in North and South America only
Cloth $110.00 ISBN: 9781447322337 Published June 2017 For sale in North and South America only
There’s no hotter area of science, at least as far as the general media and laypeople are concerned, than neuroscience—every day we hear of dramatic, surprising discoveries that seem to have the potential to utterly change our understanding of how the mind works. This book offers the first thorough review of such claims and the new biological science behind them. It examines the actual and potential applications of neuroscience within social policy and the impact of neuroscientific discoveries on long-standing moral debates and professional practices throughout social work, mental health practice, and criminal justice.
Contents
List of figures and tables
Acknowledgements
Preface
Part I: Getting to grips with the thought styles
One Biology and the drive for human improvement
Two How knowledge gets made in neuroscience and molecular biology
Three Blaming the brain
Part II: Fixing real people
Four The precarious infant brain
Five The cat is out of the bag: from early intervention to child protection
Six Perfecting people: the inexorable rise of prevention science
Seven Epigenetics: rat mum to my Mum?
Eight Human epigenetics prematurely born€?
Nine Are we broken? Fixing people (or society) in the 21st century
Appendices
Appendix A: Signs and codas
Appendix B: The amygalda: the brain’s almond
Appendix C: Statistical primer
Appendix D: The definition of autism spectrum disorder (ASD)
Appendix E: Critique of Cunha et al, 2010
References
Index
 
Review Quotes
Aotearoa New Zealand Social Work
"This book provides a wealth of information and helpful analysis. . . . I would strongly recommend that readers buy this book and share with colleagues."
John Bruer, president emeritus, James S. McDonnell Foundation
"Too often early childhood policy is founded on dogmatic interpretations of over-simplified science. Skepticism is the antidote, which this remarkable piece of scholarship provides, bringing ethical concerns to the fore."
Val Gillies, University of Westminster
"Forensically detailed, compelling and at points unsettling, this book is a very welcome antidote to simplistic policy appropriations of biology. It deserves to be widely read."
For more information, or to order this book, please visit http://www.press.uchicago.edu
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