Urban Reform and Its Consequences

A Study in Representation

Susan Welch and Timothy Bledsoe

Urban Reform and Its Consequences
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Susan Welch and Timothy Bledsoe

174 pages | 2 line drawings | © 1988
Paper $23.00 ISBN: 9780226893006 Published October 1990
Throughout this century, reformers have fought to eliminate party control of city politics. As a result, the majority of American cities today elect council members in at-large and nonpartisan elections. This result of the turn-of-the-century Progressive movement, which worked for election rules that eliminated the power of the urban machine and the working class on which it was based, is today still a subject of lively debate. For example, in the mid-1980s, regular Democrats in Chicago sought to institute a nonpartisan mayoral election. Supporters thought that reform would make the electoral process more democratic, while opponents charged that it was meant to dilute the voting powers of blacks. Clearly, the effect of urban reform remains an important issue for scholars and politicians alike.

Susan Welch and Timothy Bledsoe clarify a portion of the debate by investigating how election structures affect candidates and the nature of representation. They examine the different effects of district versus at-large elections and of partisan versus nonpartisan elections. Who gets elected? Are representatives' socioeconomic status and party affiliation related to election form? Are election structures related to how those who are elected approach their jobs? Do they see themselves as representatives concerned with the good of the city as a whole?

Urban Reform and Its Consequences reports an unprecedented wealth of data drawn from a sample of nearly 1,000 council members and communities with populations between 50,000 and 1 million across 42 states. The sample includes communities that use a variety of election procedures. This study is therefore the most comprehensive and accurate to date.

Welch and Bledsoe conclude that nonpartisan and at-large elections do give city councils a more middle- and upper-middle-class character and have changed the way representatives view their jobs. Reform measures have not, however, produced councils that are significantly more conservative or more prone to conflict. Overall, the authors conclude that partisan and district elections are more likely to represent the whole community and to make the council more accountable to the electorate.
Contents
Preface
Introduction
1. Urban Reform and Its Impact: What We Know
2. Analyzing the Consequences of Reform: Our Study
3. Election Structures and Council Members' Socioeconomic and Partisan Characteristics
4. The Impact of Election Structures on the Members' Relationships to Their Constituencies
5. The Impact of Election Structures on Policy Representation: The Policy Attitudes of Council Members and the Policy Process on the Council
6. Separating Fact from Fiction in Evaluating the Impact of Urban Reform
Appendix A
Appendix B
Notes
References
Name Index
Subject Index
For more information, or to order this book, please visit http://www.press.uchicago.edu
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