Paper $35.00 ISBN: 9780226512419 Will Publish January 2018
Cloth $105.00 ISBN: 9780226512389 Will Publish January 2018
An e-book edition will be published.

Telling It Like It Wasn’t

The Counterfactual Imagination in History and Fiction

Catherine Gallagher

Telling It Like It Wasn’t

Catherine Gallagher

416 pages | 1 table | 6 x 9 | © 2018
Paper $35.00 ISBN: 9780226512419 Will Publish January 2018
Cloth $105.00 ISBN: 9780226512389 Will Publish January 2018
E-book $35.00 ISBN: 9780226512556 Will Publish January 2018
Inventing counterfactual histories is a common pastime of modern day historians, both amateur and professional. We speculate about an America ruled by Jefferson Davis, a Europe that never threw off Hitler, or a second term for JFK. These narratives are often written off as politically inspired fantasy or as pop culture fodder, but in Telling It Like It Wasn’t, Catherine Gallagher takes the history of counterfactual history seriously, pinning it down as an object of dispassionate study. She doesn’t take a moral or normative stand on the practice, but focuses her attention on how it works and to what ends—a quest that takes readers on a fascinating tour of literary and historical criticism.

Gallagher locates the origins of contemporary counterfactual history in eighteenth-century Europe, where the idea of other possible historical worlds first took hold in philosophical disputes about Providence before being repurposed by military theorists as a tool for improving the art of war. In the next century, counterfactualism became a legal device for deciding liability, and lengthy alternate-history fictions appeared, illustrating struggles for historical justice. These early motivations—for philosophical understanding, military improvement, and historical justice—are still evident today in our fondness for counterfactual tales featuring the Civil War and Nazis. Alternate histories of the Civil War and WWII abound, but here, Gallagher shows how the counterfactual habit of replaying the recent past often shaped the actual events themselves. The counterfactual mode lets us continue to envision our future by reconsidering the range of previous alternatives. Throughout this engaging and eye-opening book, Gallagher encourages readers to ask important questions about our obsession with counterfactual history and the roots of our tendency to ask “What if…?”
Contents
Introduction
Chapter One. The History of Counterfactual History from Leibniz to Clausewitz
Chapter Two. Nineteenth-Century Alternate-History Narratives
Chapter Three. How the USA Lost the Civil War
Chapter Four. Historical Activism and the Alternate-America Novels
Chapter Five. Nazi Britain: The Invasion and Occupation That Weren’t
Chapter Six. The Fictions of Nazi Britain
Acknowledgments
Notes
Index
Review Quotes
Hayden White | University Professor of the History of Consciousness, Emeritus, University of California
“Gallagher’s new book is a genuinely original contribution to both the theory (and history) of the novel and the theory of history. Philosophers and historians have been debating the cognitive status of historical narratives for over half a century without taking into account the contributions to theory of narrative made by modern literary scholars. Based on a trove of ‘counterfactualist’ writings that have been little studied until of late, Gallagher’s book sheds new light on the differences between history, myth, fiction, hypotheticals, the historical romance, and fantasy writing. Moreover, her book is mercifully free of jargon, her discussion of ‘counterfactual’ history is subtle and sophisticated, and her analysis of the relation between fiction and hypothesis convincing.”
Paul K. Saint-Amour, author of Tense Future: Modernism, Total War, Encyclopedic Form
"At a time when fact itself is under siege, why tarry with thought experiments about pasts that didn't happen? Gallagher's answer is a historicist one: although counterfactual narratives have been with us in many forms since antiquity, their full story has remained untold. Fortunately, we no longer have to live in a timeline where Telling It Like It Wasn't has yet to be written. To read this engrossing book is to be haunted not by lives unled but by previously undermapped regions of history, philosophy, theology, legal reasoning, and literature."
 
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