The Public Good and the Brazilian State

Municipal Finance and Public Services in São Paulo, 1822–1930

Anne G. Hanley

The Public Good and the Brazilian State

Anne G. Hanley

288 pages | 5 line drawings, 32 tables | 6 x 9 | © 2018
Cloth $60.00 ISBN: 9780226535074 Will Publish April 2018
E-book $60.00 ISBN: 9780226535104 Will Publish April 2018
Who and what a government taxes, and how the government spends the money collected, are questions of primary concern to governments large and small, national and local. When public revenues pay for high-quality infrastructure and social services, citizens thrive and crises are averted. When public revenues are inadequate to provide those goods, inequality thrives and communities can verge into unrest—as evidenced by the riots during Greece’s financial meltdown and by the needless loss of life in Haiti’s collapse in the wake of the earthquake.

In The Public Good and the Brazilian State, Anne G. Hanley assembles an economic history of public revenues as they developed in nineteenth-century Brazil. Specifically, Hanley investigates the financial life of the municipality—a district comparable to the county in the United States—to understand how the local state organized and prioritized the provision of public services, what revenues paid for those services, and what happened when the revenues collected failed to satisfy local needs. Through detailed analyses of municipal ordinances, mayoral reports, citizen complaints, and financial documents, Hanley sheds light on the evolution of public finance and its effect on the early economic development of Brazilian society. This deeply researched book offers valuable insights for anyone seeking to better understand how municipal finance informs histories of inequality and underdevelopment. 
Review Quotes
Gail D. Triner, Rutgers University

The Public Good and the Brazilian State dives deep into the interstices of municipal public goods. Stepping back from the more expected econometric analyses, this book displays the actual goods provided and the choices and trade-offs that municipalities had to make in order to meet their obligations to citizens. Slaughterhouses, vaccination centers, hospitals, schools, roads, bridges, drainage systems, water fountains, and public buildings are the stuff of this book. Hanley's richly detailed and carefully researched account will make strong contributions to the histories of municipal finance and Brazil, as well as the field of urban history more broadly.” 
 

For more information, or to order this book, please visit http://www.press.uchicago.edu
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