The Works of    Le Opere di    Giuseppe Verdi


The Board of the Critical Edition

The Editors

Philip Gossett

Philip Gossett is the Robert W. Reneker Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Music and the Humanities at the University of Chicago. He is general editor emeritus of The Works of Giuseppe Verdi and also served for many years as director of the Edizione critica delle opere di Gioachino Rossini, published by the Fondazione Rossini of Pesaro, Italy, a project now continuing as the Works of Gioachino Rossini under the auspices of Bärenreiter Verlag of Kassel.

Gossett has published books and articles in a wide range of subject areas, from Renaissance music to nineteenth-century Italian opera to editorial theory. His book “Anna Bolena” and the Artistic Maturity of Gaetano Donizetti (Oxford University Press, 1985) won the ASCAP/Deems Taylor Award in 1986. In November 2007 his latest book, Divas and Scholars: Performing Italian Opera, published by the University of Chicago Press, won the Otto Kinkeldey Award of the American Musicological Society as the best monograph of 2006. Among his many essays and articles on Verdi are “Verdi, Ghislanzoni, and Aida: The Uses of Convention” (Critical Inquiry, 1974), “Toward a Critical Edition of Macbeth” (Verdi’s “Macbeth”: A Sourcebook, Norton, 1984), and “The Hot and the Cold: Verdi writes to Antonio Somma about Re Lear” (Variations on the Canon: Essays on Music from Bach to Boulez in Honor of Charles Rosen on His Eightieth Birthday, University of Rochester Press, 2008).

In addition to serving as general editor emeritus of WGV, Gossett is the principal volume editor of La forza del destino.

Francesco Izzo

Francesco Izzo is professor of music at the University of Southampton. He holds a Ph.D. in musicology from New York University. Before joining the faculty at the University of Southampton in 2007, he was assistant professor of music at East Carolina University from 2005–07. In 2009 he was visiting associate professor of music at the University of Chicago, where he taught a graduate seminar on opera and cultural transfer, while working closely with Philip Gossett on his edition of Verdi’s Un giorno di regno, forthcoming in The Works of Giuseppe Verdi.

Izzo’s research focuses on nineteenth-century opera and song. His book Laughter between Two Revolutions: Opera Buffa in Italy, 1831–1848 appeared in the University of Rochester Press’s Eastman School of Music Series in 2013. His articles have appeared in Acta Musicologica, Cambridge Opera Journal, Journal of the American Musicological Society, Journal of Musicology, Studi Musicali, and other international journals and collections of essays.

As a writer and speaker, Izzo is committed to forging bridges between academia and the general public and between scholars and opera practitioners. He is frequently invited as a lecturer, contributor to program notes, and consultant at opera houses and festivals in Europe and the United States, including Glyndebourne, Sarasota Opera, the Welsh National Opera, the Royal Opera House, the Teatro di San Carlo in Naples, and the BBC. As a pianist and vocal accompanist, Izzo has worked with distinguished artists, including Rockwell Blake and Giuseppe Taddei; he routinely provides stylistic advice, ornamentation, and cadenzas for opera singers; and he is interested in the study and performance of neglected nineteenth-century song repertoire.

In his capacity as archivist, associate director and, since 2010, codirector of the American Institute for Verdi Studies at New York University, Izzo has collaborated closely with The Works of Giuseppe Verdi. His edition of Un giorno di regno premiered at the Sarasota Opera in March 2013 under the musical direction of Victor De Renzi. In 2014 and 2015, Izzo served as consultant for the Sarasota Opera’s productions of Jérusalem; and the French five-act Don Carlos, both of which are currently in preparation for WGV.

Marta Tonegutti

Marta Tonegutti is the managing editor of The Works of Giuseppe Verdi and the editor for music at the University of Chicago Press.

The Board

Fabrizio Della Seta

Fabrizio Della Seta graduated in music history with Nino Pirrotta at the University of Rome “La Sapienza” in 1975 and in 1977 received a diploma in music composition from the Conservatory “Santa Cecilia” in Rome. Since 2000 he has been professor of musicology in the Facoltà di Musicologia (now Dipartimento di Musicologia e Beni culturali) at the University of Pavia in Cremona, where he teaches history of music and musical philology and is responsible for the doctoral program in musicology. In 2009 he was visiting professor in the Department of Music at the University of Chicago. An expert on Bellini and Verdi, in 1999 he became co-general editor of the Edizione critica delle opere di Vincenzo Bellini (Ricordi) and in 2009 he joined the Verdi Board as well as the advisory board of the Edizione nazionale delle opere di Giovan Battista Pergolesi (Fondazione Pergolesi Spontini; Ricordi). Also in 2009, he became director of the Centro di documentazione per gli studi belliniani at the University of Catania and editor of the online journal Bollettino di sudi belliniani. Della Seta’s scholarly work extends from the late Middle Ages to the twentieth century and focuses mostly on nineteenth-century Italian opera. In addition to his many scholarly articles and encyclopedia entries, he is the author of Italia e Francia nell’Ottocento (EDT, 1993); Beethoven: Sinfonia Eroica. Una guida (Carocci, 2004); “… non senza pazzia. Prospettive sul teatro musicale (Carocci, 2008) (English edition: Not Without Madness: Perspectives on Opera, University of Chicago Press, 2013). He has prepared critical editions of Verdi’s La traviata (1996), including La traviata: Autograph Sketches and Drafts (2000); Rossini’s, Adina (2000); and Bellini’s, I Puritani (2013). In 2005 he received the Luigi ed Eleonora Ronga International Award for Musicology and Music Criticism from he Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei and was elected member of the Accademia Europea. In 2014 his edition of I Puritani received the Claude V. Palisca Award from the American Musicological Society for the best musical edition published in 2013.

Gabriele Dotto

Gabriele Dotto studied composition and analysis in the United States and Italy. He has published and lectured on Italian opera, the history of music publishing, the development of intellectual property concepts, and issues of textual criticism of music; contributed to English and Italian encyclopedias; and translated numerous academic texts (into English or Italian), including several volumes of WGV. He has prepared critical editions of Rossini’s Bianca e Falliero; Donizetti’s Linda di Chamounix, Don Pasquale, and Lucia di Lammermoor (the latter two with Roger Parker); and Puccini’s Madama Butterfly (in preparation). For WGV he is the volume editor for Falstaff and Don Carlo/s. Dotto was the first managing editor of WGV (1986–1992) and joined the Board in 1992. He is co-general editor of the Operas of Gaetano Donizetti and general editor of the Operas of Giacomo Puccini critical editions. He served on the committees establishing editorial norms for the critical editions of the works of Kurt Weill and the works of Giacomo Meyerbeer, and serves on the boards of the critical editions of the works of Vincenzo Bellini and G. S. Mayr, as well as of the journal Verdi Forum. A founding member of the Centro Studi Giacomo Puccini (Lucca), he was administrative director of the Istituto Nazionale di Studi Verdiani in Parma (2004–07), coordinated the transition (2002–04) of the Archivio Storico Ricordi (ASR) from a corporate to a private archive (now housed in the Braidense Library of Milan), and is ASR’s consulente scientifico for its publishing and exhibition projects. As a publishing professional he was editor-in-chief of Casa Ricordi in Milan (1979–86), acquisitions editor at the University of Chicago Press (1986–92), director of publishing at Casa Ricordi/Bertelsmann (1992–2001). Dotto is currently director of the Michigan State University Press.

Andreas Giger

Andreas Giger is the Louise and Kenneth L. Kinney Professor of Opera and professor of musicology at Louisiana State University. He holds a Lizentiat in Musicology from the University of Zurich, a Lehrdiplom in piano from the Winterthur Conservatory, and a PhD in musicology from Indiana University. He was associate director of the Center for the History of Music Theory and Literature at Indiana University (1998–2000) and now serves on the Center’s board of directors. Giger’s research interests focus on nineteenth-century Italian opera and on the work of Leonard Bernstein. For WGV, he edited I due Foscari (forthcoming, 2016) and, in collaboration with Ilaria Narici, is editing Un ballo in maschera; for Bärenreiter, he is editing Ruggero Leoncavallo’s Pagliacci. He is the author of “Verismo” in the Handwörterbuch der musikalischen Terminologie (Steiner, 2004) and of Verdi and the French Aesthetic: Verse, Stanza, and Melody in Nineteenth-Century Opera (Cambridge University Press, 2008). He has also published in several books and journals, including the Journal of the American Musicological Society, Journal of the Society for American Music, Journal of Musicology, Cambridge Opera Journal, Acta musicologica, Music & Letters, and Nineteenth-Century Music Review, among others, as well as in The Cambridge Companion to Verdi, The Cambridge Verdi Encyclopedia, the Oxford Handbook of Opera, and The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians. Giger has co-edited Music in the Mirror: Reflections on the History of Music Theory and Literature for the 21st Century (University of Nebraska Press, 2000), for which he received an ASCAP Deems Taylor Award. He is associate editor of the Verdi Forum and an editor and member of the editorial board of Nineteenth-Century Music Review. Andreas joined the Board in 2014.

Helen Greenwald

Helen Greenwald teaches courses on Verdi, Wagner, Puccini, Rossini, and Mozart at the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, where she will serve as chair of the Department of Music History and Musicology beginning in July 2016; she was visiting professor in the Department of Music at the University of Chicago in 2008. Her work on vocal music of the eighteenth through twentieth centuries has appeared in an international array of publications, including Nineteenth-century Music, Acta Musicologica, Journal of the American Musicological Society, the Mozart-Jahrbuch, Cambridge Opera Journal, the Salzburger Akademische Beiträge, Intersections: revue canadienne de musique, Music & Letters, Journal of the Music Library Association: Notes, Nineteenth-Century Music Review, Current Musicology, The Cambridge Verdi Encyclopedia, The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, and The Encyclopedia of New England Culture. She is the convenor and editor of the Oxford Handbook of Opera (Oxford University Press, 2014) and editor of Verdi’s Attila (University of Chicago Press/Ricordi, 2012), which was premiered in February 2010 by Riccardo Muti in his debut at the Metropolitan Opera, and Rossini’s Zelmira (Fondazione Rossini/Ricordi, 2005), which was premiered in August 2009 by Robert Abbado at the Rossini Opera Festival in Pesaro, Italy, and released as a DVD on Decca in 2012. She serves on the advisory boards of the American Institute for Verdi Studies; Mosaic; the ninth edition of Grout, Burkholder, and Palisca’s A History of Western Music (Norton, 2014), and the Amy Beach Edition. She has also been a referee for the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), which selected her Attila edition as a featured project on its website. Greenwald writes frequently for the Metropolitan Opera, the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and the Royal Opera House at Covent Garden. Her current projects include the critical edition of Pietro Mascagni’s Cavalleria rusticana for Bärenreiter. She joined the Board in 2014.

David Lawton

David Lawton is professor of music at Stony Brook University, where he served as director of graduate studies from 1986–96 and department chair from 1996–2000. Currently he teaches music history and serves as the artistic director of the Stony Brook Opera and the managing director of the Stony Brook Symphony Orchestra. A noted Verdi scholar, he has published numerous articles on the composer, and is volume editor for the critical editions of Il trovatore, Macbeth, and Le trouvère (forthcoming) for The Works of Giuseppe Verdi. In 2006 his critical edition of Macbeth was awarded the Claude V. Palisca Award for the best musical edition by the American Musicological Society. He was appointed to the Board of the Verdi edition in 2007, and has been a member of the executive and advisory board of the American Institute for Verdi Studies since its founding. As an opera conductor he has appeared frequently with regional American opera companies, primarily on the East Coast, and has enjoyed long associations with Opera Delaware in Wilmington, where he was artistic consultant for more than twenty years, and with Summer Opera Theater Co. in Washington, D.C., where he was resident conductor.

Roberta Montemorra Marvin

Roberta Montemorra Marvin is director of the Opera Studies Forum in the Obermann Center for Advanced Studies at the University of Iowa, where she has also served as associate dean of International Programs, and has been a College of Liberal Arts and Sciences dean’s scholar and a Stanley International Programs–Obermann Center fellow. For WGV, Marvin has edited I masnadieri, the volume of Inni/Hymns, and the Sinfonia in D for the volume of juvenilia (forthcoming); she was also associate general editor for the series from 2005 to 2015, when she joined the Board. Author of The Politics of Verdi’s “Cantica” (Royal Musical Association, 2014) and Verdi the Student—Verdi the Teacher (Nazionale Studi Verdiani, 2010) which won the Premio Internazionale Giuseppe Verdi. Marvin has been the recipient of prestigious fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Philosophical Society, the Fulbright program, the Bogliasco Foundation, and the Howard Foundation, among others. She is co-editor of six books, most recently The Idea of Art Music in a Commercial World, 1800–1930 (Boydell, 2016) and Music in Print and Beyond: Hildegard von Bingen to The Beatles (University of Rochester Press, 2013), and sole editor of The Cambridge Verdi Encyclopedia (2013). Marvin has also published in several books and journals, including Studi Verdiani, Music & Letters, Cambridge Opera Journal, Studi musicali, Bollettino del Centro rossiniano di studi, and The Musical Quarterly, as well as chapters in the books Verdi’s Middle Period: Source Studies, Analysis, and Performance Practice; The Arts of the Prima Donna in the Long Nineteenth Century; Europe, Empire, and Spectacle in Nineteenth-Century British Music; Art and Ideology in European Opera; and Fashions and Legacies of Nineteenth-Century Italian Opera; among others. Marvin is editor-in-chief for Verdi Forum and also serves as the series editor for Ashgate Interdisciplinary Studies in Opera.

Giorgio Pestelli

Giorgio Pestelli completed his humanistic and musical studies at the University and Music Conservatory of Torino (piano and composition diplomas). He is emeritus professor of musicology at the University of Torino, Facoltà di Lettere, and also taught at the Universities of Genova and Bologna (doctoral program in musicology). He is codirector of the journals Saggiatore Musicale and Rivista Musicale Italiana and wrote entries for several musical encyclopedias. Between 1982 and 1986 he was artistic director of the Orchestra Sinfonica e Coro della Rai di Torino. He is a member of the Accademia dei Lincei, the Accademia delle Scienze di Torino, and the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia. His scholarly interests range from eighteenth-century European instrumental music to the Wiener Klassik, opera, music and Romanticism, and the history of music criticism. He edited and wrote, with Lorenzo Bianconi, the series Storia dell'opera italiana vol. 4–6. His publications include L’età di Mozart e di Beethoven (EDT, 1979 ) (expanded English edition: The Age of Mozart and Beethoven, Cambridge University Press, 1984), and Canti del destino: Studi su Brahms (Einaudi, 2000).

David Rosen

David Rosen is emeritus professor of music at Cornell University. He received his BA in history from Reed College and his MA and PhD in music from the University of California at Berkeley. Most of his teaching career was divided between the University of Wisconsin—Madison and Cornell. His research has centered on nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century Italian music, primarily Verdi and Puccini, although he has written about opera theory, French grand opera, Mozart piano concertos, Stanislavsky as opera director, and film music as well. He edited Verdi’s Messa da Requiem in The Works of Giuseppe Verdi and wrote the Cambridge Music Handbook about that work. He has long been interested in the staging manuals (disposizioni sceniche or livrets de mise en scène) and other sources that help us reconstruct the visual aspects of nineteenth-century opera, and he co-authored a volume dedicated to the disposizione scenica of Verdi’s Un ballo in maschera and is at work on a co-authored edition of the Mise en scène of Puccini’s La fanciulla del Westfor the Edizione nazionale delle opere di Giacomo Puccini. Other current projects include editing a substantial volume of Harold S. Powers’s essays on Italian opera. He edited The Verdi Forum (formerly The Verdi Newsletter), the publication of the American Institute for Verdi Studies, for several years and is a member of the Institute’s executive board. In addition to the Board of The Works of Giuseppe Verdi, which he joined in 2007, he is also on the advisory boards (consiglio scientifico) of the Fondo Leoncavallo (Locarno, Switzerland) and the Centro Studi Giacomo Puccini (Lucca, Italy).

Emilio Sala

After his musical training in clarinet and saxophone, Emilio Sala studied musicology at the University of Venice. He was a lecturer in music at the University of Urbino from 1990 to 1999, teaching classes in history of music and history of opera. Since 1999 he has been associate professor at the University of Milan, where he currently teaches music dramaturgy and musical historiography. In 2014 he obtained the “Abilitazione Scientifica Nazionale” as full professor. He serves as a member on many boards, including the Fondazione Rossini (Pesaro), the Giacomo Puccini National Edition (Lucca) and the Fondazione Pergolesi-Spontini (Iesi). In 2014 he joined the Verdi Board. He is also member of the “Conseil d’orientation” of the Palazzetto Bru Zane-Centre de musique romantique française (Paris-Venice). From April 2012 to December 2014 he was scientific director of the Istituto Nazionale di Studi Verdiani (Parma) and director of its journal, Studi Verdiani. He is director of the collection “Tesi rossiniane” for the Fondazione Rossini. He has published several books as author and editor. His last work, The Sounds of Paris in Verdi’s “La traviata”, was published by Cambridge University Press (2013). His articles and essays have appeared in various miscellaneous volumes (proceedings, encyclopedic entries, etc.) and international music journals (Cambridge Opera Journal, Musica/Realtà, Musica e storia, Opera Quarterly, Orages, Revue de Musicologie, R.H.L.F., Saggiatore musicale, Studi verdiani, etc.). He has held many seminars and lectures at the Université François Rabelais of Tours, the University of Bern, and other prestigious universities. In 2014 he was awarded the Luigi ed Eleonora Ronga International Prize for Musicology (Rome, Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei). He joined the Board in 2016.

 

 

The University of Chicago Press
1427 E. 60th Street • Chicago, IL 60637 USA
Voice: 773.702.7700 • Fax: 773.702.9756
The University of Chicago Press Home


Philip Gossett,
General Editor Emeritus

Francesco Izzo,
General Editor

Marta Tonegutti,
Managing Editor

Fabrizio Della Seta
Gabriele Dotto
Andreas Giger
Helen Greenwald
David Lawton
Roberta Montemorra Marvin
Giorgio Pestelli
David Rosen
Emilio Sala
Julian Budden
Martin Chusid
Francesco Degrada
Ursula Günther
Pierluigi Petrobelli