[UCP Books]: Introducing Chicago Shorts

  

 

  “Longer than a tweet and shorter than A River Runs Through It   

INTRODUCING CHICAGO SHORTS
Publication Date: February 1, 2013


 
The University of Chicago Press is pleased to announce the launch of Chicago Shorts—distinguished selections, including never-before-published material, off-the-radar reads culled from the University of Chicago Press’s commanding archive, and the best of our newest books, all priced for impulse buying and presented exclusively in DRM-free e-book format.

Aimed at the general reader and running the gamut from the latest in contemporary scholarship to can’t-miss chapters from classic publications, Chicago Shorts turn the page on the twenty-first-century reading experience.
 
Among the inaugural batch of nine Shorts, you’ll find:
 
·         What Every Novelist Needs to Know about Narrators by Wayne C. Booth
·         Ebert’s Bests by Roger Ebert
·         Nixon and the Silver Screen by Mark Feeney
·         A Little History of Photography Criticism; or, Why Do Photography Critics Hate Photography? by Susie Linfield
·         Custer’s Last Stand: The Unfinished Manuscript by Norman Maclean
·         Shylock on Trial: The Appellate Briefs by Richard Posner and Charles Fried
·         Erika and Klaus Mann in New York: Escape from the Magic Mountain by Andrea Weiss
·         Bill Veeck’s Crosstown Classic by Bill Veeck with Ed Linn
·         Rabbits with Horns and Other Astounding Viruses by Carl Zimmer

To celebrate our launch of the series and whet your palettes, we’ll be offering Bill Veeck’s Crosstown Classic for free throughout the month of February. All other Shorts will be priced at $3.99 and available across all major e-book platforms, as well as from the University of Chicago Press website.

Stay tuned for more information, including the June launch of our Summer Shorts series, which includes Richard A. Peterson’s How Hank Williams Created Country Music, Michael LaBarbera’s It’s Alive! The Mad Science of Movie Monsters, and Sara Suleri Goodyear’s Excellent Things about Women: A Memoir of Postcolonial Pakistan, among other titles fit for the longest days of the year.

These Chicago Shorts officially publish on February 1, 2013. For more information or to request a review copy, please be in touch with me at the email or telephone number below. For additional information on individual shorts, please read on after the jump.

All the (truncated) best,
Kristi McGuire
Web and New Media Editor, University of Chicago Press
 
What Every Novelist Needs to Know about Narrators by Wayne C. Booth
 
In What Every Novelist Needs to Know about Narrators, Booth tackles one of the most difficult issues writers of fiction face: the choice of which narrative approach to take in their work. With trademark Booth aplomb, he articulates the methods behind dramatization, character development, and point of view that are indispensable for successful writing.
 
**
Ebert’s Bests by Roger Ebert
 
Recounting the influence of the French New Wave, his friendships with Werner Herzog and Martin Scorsese, as well as travels to Sweden and Rome to visit Ingrid Bergman and Federico Fellini, Roger Ebert never loses sight of film as a key component of our cultural identity. Extending this to his accompanying selection of “10 Bests,” he reminds us that hearts and minds—and even rankings—are bound to change.
 
**
Nixon and the Silver Screen by Mark Feeney
 
Bearing in mind the events that shaped his presidency from 1969 to 1974, Feeney sees aspects of Nixon’s character—and the nation’s—refracted and reimagined in the more than 500 films Nixon watched during his tenure in the White House. The verdict? Nixon’s legacy, for better or worse, is forever representative of the “Silver Age” in Hollywood, shaping and being shaped by the flickering screen.
 
**
A Little History of Photography Criticism; or, Why Do Photography Critics Hate Photography? by Susie Linfield
 
For many years, Linfield’s astute analysis of photographs—from events as wide-ranging as the Holocaust, the Chinese Cultural Revolution, and recent acts of terrorism—has explored a complex connection between the practices of photojournalism and the rise of human rights ideals. By asking how photography should respond to the darker shadows of modern life, Linfield insists on the continuing moral relevance of photojournalism, while urging us not to avert our eyes from what James Agee once labeled “the cruel radiance of what is.”
 
**
Custer’s Last Stand: The Unfinished Manuscript by Norman Maclean
 
In his eighty-seven years, Norman Maclean played many parts: fisherman, logger, firefighter, scholar, teacher. But it was a role he took up late in life, that of writer, that won him enduring fame and critical acclaim—as well as the devotion of readers worldwide. Yet many remain unaware that much earlier in his life Maclean had spent years trying to write about a favorite topic: General Custer and the Battle of the Little Bighorn. The portions of that writing that remain reveal a deep interest not only in the battle itself but also its afterlife—how historical events influence popular culture and how retellings revise the past.
 
**
Shylock on Trial: The Appellate Briefs by Richard A. Posner and Charles Fried
 
In Shylock on Trial: The Appellate Briefs, the Hon. Richard A. Posner and Charles Fried rule on Shakespeare’s classic drama The Merchant of Venice. Framed as a decision argued by two appellate judges of the period in a trail following Shylock’s sentencing by the Duke of Venice, these essays playfully walk the line between law and culture, dissecting the alleged legal inconsistencies of Shylock’s trial while engaging in an artful reading of the play itself.
 
**
Erika and Klaus Mann in New York: Escape from the Magic Mountain by Andrea Weiss
 
In 1936, two of Thomas Mann’s children—Erika and Klaus—fled to the United States and chose New York as their new adopted home. From the start, the two were embroiled by the literary and intellectual life, political turmoil, and shifting sexual mores of their times. Andrea Weiss engages their struggles, their friendships (Maurice Wertheim and Annemarie Schwarzenbach, among them), and their liaisons, as the siblings try to adapt to their new lives, all while introducing their work to an American audience for the first time.
 
**
Bill Veeck’s Crosstown Classic by Bill Veeck with Ed Linn
 
Baseball Hall of Famer Bill Veeck (1914–86) was an inspired team builder, a consummate showman, and one of the greatest baseball men ever involved in the game. Bill Veeck’s Crosstown Classic, drawn from his uproarious autobiography (cowritten with the talented sportswriter Ed Linn), is an unforgettable trip packed with anecdotes and insight about the history of baseball and tales of players and owners—some of the most entertaining stories in all of sports literature.
 
**
Rabbits with Horns and Other Astounding Viruses by Carl Zimmer
 
Viruses are the smallest living things known to science, yet they hold the entire planet in their sway. Through his engaging considerations of the tobacco mosaic virus, viruses in ocean algae, and the human papillomavirus, award-winning science writer Carl Zimmer brings us up to speed on the nuances and depth of today’s cutting-edge scientific research on virology.

 

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