Section Descriptions

Marine Resource Economics is an outlet for early results and imaginative new thinking on emerging topics in the marine environment, as well as rigorous theoretical and empirical analyses of questions that have long interested economists who study the oceans and coastal zones. Specific topics of interest include:

 
  • fisheries
  • aquaculture
  • seafood marketing and trade
  • emerging marine technologies
  • recreation demand
  • non-market values of coastal resources
  • catch shares (e.g. ITQs, TURFs) and common property governance of marine resources
  • ecosystem-based management
  • marine reserves, spatial zoning, and other forms of spatial management
  • ocean energy resources and seabed mining
  • marine and estuarine water quality
  • coastal climate adaptation
  • marine shipping and transportation
 
The journal is comprised of four sections: Articles, Perspectives, Systematic Reviews, and Book Reviews.

Articles

Articles generate significant theoretical insights, develop or substantially customize new methods, and/or include rigorous empirical findings of broad relevance to economists studying the oceans and coastal zones. Articles are generally 30-40 double-spaced manuscript pages and constitute major contributions to the economics of marine resources. Articles that exceed 50 double-spaced pages in length will not be considered for publication. They are subject to a single-blind peer review process.

Perspectives

Perspectives generally range from 10-20 double-spaced manuscript pages and can be in one of three categories: 1) short, applied papers that are empirically rigorous and contribute to knowledge, but do not necessarily make theoretical or methodological contributions; 2) papers that offer important historical perspectives on marine resource economics that are of broad interest; or 3) timely communications about current events worthy of wide circulation that are grounded in economics, but not necessarily empirical. These contributions are subject to a single-blind peer review process.

Systematic Reviews

Systematic Reviews are solicited by the Editor-In-Chief. Prospective authors are welcome to suggest topics by emailing the Editor-In-Chief directly. Systematic Reviews synthesize what is known theoretically and empirically about a particular topic, include an extensive reference list (up to 250), are generally 30-40 double-spaced manuscript pages, and, to the extent possible, use meta-analysis. They are subject to a single-blind peer review process.

Book Reviews

Book Reviews are solicited by the Book Review Editor. Prospective authors are welcome to suggest books to review by emailing the Book Review Editor directly. They are reviewed by the Book Review Editor only.

Submission guidelines can be found on the inside back cover of each issue and on the journal’s website: journals.uchicago.edu/mre